ASMR 💓 Sweet Chilli Hummus Carrot Mouth Sounds

My quick fix snack between videos.

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“Hummus” comes from the Arabic word meaning “chickpeas”, and the complete name of the prepared spread in Arabic is ḥummuṣ bi ṭaḥīna which means “chickpeas with tahini”.

Spelling of the word in English can be inconsistent. “Hummus” is the most common spelling in both American and British English. The spelling “houmous” is however common enough in British English to be also listed as a less common spelling in some UK dictionaries but not, for example, in the Cambridge online dictionary. Some US dictionaries also list other spellings such as humus, hommus, and hommos, but not Merriam-Webster, for example.

The earliest known recipes for a dish similar to hummus bi tahina are recorded in cookbooks written in Cairo in the 13th century. Hummus has been connected to the Ayyubid Sultan, Saladin, and according to some food historians he first prepared it. A cold purée of chickpeas with vinegar and pickled lemons with herbs, spices, and oil, but no tahini or garlic, appears in the Kanz al-Fawa’id fi Tanwi’ al-Mawa’id; and a purée of chickpeas and tahini called hummus kasa appears in the Kitab Wasf al-Atima al-Mutada: it is based on puréed chickpeas and tahini, and acidulated with vinegar (though not lemon), but it also contains many spices, herbs, and nuts, and no garlic. It is also served by rolling it out and letting it sit overnight, which presumably gives it a very different texture from hummus bi tahina. Indeed, its basic ingredients—chickpeas, sesame, lemon, and garlic—have been eaten in the region for millennia. Though chickpeas were widely eaten in the region, and they were often cooked in stews and other hot dishes, puréed chickpeas eaten cold with tahini do not appear before the Abbasid period in Egypt and the Levant.

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